A Basic Knitted Sweater

If you've knit a sweater but wanted to cry when you realized that the size didn't turn out right after all your hard work, you are NOT alone. And if you’re too frightened to attempt making a sweater because you've heard horror stories from your fellow knitters, well, you're not alone either.

Finishing Join shoulder seams. Did this article help you? Knit 6 rows for garter-stitch band.

Aug 10,  · Edit Article How to Knit a Sweater for Beginners. Four Parts: Choosing Your Size and Gathering Materials Creating the Front and Back Pieces of the Sweater Making the Sleeves Assembling Your Sweater Community Q&A Knitting a sweater can be a daunting project for someone who is just beginning to knit%(39).
The sweater pattern you try first depends on your skill set, but even if you’ve been knitting for years, it’s best to keep everything as basic as you can for your first one.. I wouldn’t recommend going for a sweater that features colorwork, charts or any other kind of advanced stitch for your first project. Techniques like those can be overwhelming when they’re paired with unfamiliar.
The sweater pattern you try first depends on your skill set, but even if you’ve been knitting for years, it’s best to keep everything as basic as you can for your first one.. I wouldn’t recommend going for a sweater that features colorwork, charts or any other kind of advanced stitch for your first project. Techniques like those can be overwhelming when they’re paired with unfamiliar.
Jun 11,  · Beginning with a purl row, work in stockinette stitch (knit 1 row, purl 1 row) until piece measures approximately 15 inches from beginning ending with a purl row. Armhole Shaping: At the beginning of the next 2 rows, bind off 4 loadingtag.ga: Better Homes & Gardens.
The sweater pattern you try first depends on your skill set, but even if you’ve been knitting for years, it’s best to keep everything as basic as you can for your first one.. I wouldn’t recommend going for a sweater that features colorwork, charts or any other kind of advanced stitch for your first project. Techniques like those can be overwhelming when they’re paired with unfamiliar.

Sweater knitting patterns hold a certain allure to most knitters. The idea of learning how to knit a sweater made by your own hands on chilly evenings sends many of us to our yarn stash to find the perfect yarn in the perfect quantity (finding the perfect pattern is either the easiest thing in the world or a giant chore, and there really doesn’t seem to be anything in between).

The sweater is simple and small enough for you to complete in a week if you're determined, but has enough variety that you'll learn new skills that you can apply to other patterns. Knowing the proper way to make and measure a gauge swatch and using nothing more than elementary school arithmetic, you can make any sweater turn out the right size. If you ask me, this shouldn't be revolutionary at all.

It's simple common sense. But, as I'm sure you've observed, common sense is not all that common. Doesn't THAT sound like a great thing to learn?? Yours was a real treasure in a simple package. Many of us owe you a huge thank you for your contribution to advancing the craft I don't think I've given a workshop in the last 15 years without mentioning you and your [approach].

The pace was perfect If you've knit a sweater but wanted to cry when you realized that the size didn't turn out right after all your hard work, you are NOT alone. Hard to believe, right? But there IS a better way to approach making a sweater and that's why I created this workshop. In this part video workshop, you will create a child's size one sweater using my simple, coherent, sweater-making approach.

It will be your first and perhaps most significant step in making sweaters that fit—every time. Use your size 8 needles to work the first six rows of the sleeve in the garter stitch. This will form the border for your sleeves. Switch to size 10 needles and stockinette stitch.

After your sixth row, switch your needles to the size 10 pair. Then, begin working the rows in the stockinette stitch. You will need to work increases as you continue to knit the sleeve. This will ensure that the sleeve will get larger as you work up towards the shoulder. Begin working increases when your sleeve is about 30 rows in total. Then, work an increase into the edge stitch every four rows as you make your way up to the shoulder.

To increase, knit into the stitch as usual, but do not slip the old stitch off the needle yet. Knit into the same stitch again by inserting the needle through the back of the stitch instead of through the front of the stitch.

Then allow the old stitch to slide off as the two new stitches replace it. Continue working the rows of your sweater sleeve. Keep going until your sleeve is the required measurement for your size. The sleeve size measurements include: Bind off the stitches. When your sleeve is the desired length, you will need to bind off the stitches. This will secure them so that you can sew the sleeves onto the front and back pieces. Repeat to create your second sleeve. After you finish one sleeve, make sure to make a second one.

Make your second sleeve exactly the same way as the first one. Thread your yarn needle. This will help to ensure that the yarn will not get tangled as you sew. Make sure to use the same color and type of yarn that you used for your sweater pieces. Keep in mind that you will need to rethread the needle before sewing each piece of the sweater, so have some yarn ready to go. Sew the sleeves closed. Line up the edges of one of your sleeves so that the right sides are facing each other and the long edges are even.

Sew from the bottom corner of the sleeve near the six row border to the end of the edge near the shoulder. Then, tie off the yarn and cut any excess yarn. Leave the sleeves turned wrong side out for now. Sew together the front and back pieces of the sweater. Line up the two pieces of your sweater so that the right sides are facing each other and the edges are even. Remember that these should be identical pieces, so lining up the edges should be easy.

Then, begin sewing from the bottom corner of the sweater on the edge of the six row border you created and up towards the top. Stop sewing when you reach the armhole space. Leave the piece turned inside out for now.

After you have finished sewing up the sleeves and sides of the sweater, you will need to attach the sleeves to the shoulder area of the sweater body pieces. Take one of the sleeves and line it up so that the seam is facing downwards. Begin sewing where the seam of the sleeve and the seam of the body piece meet.

This will be in the armpit area. Sew around the sleeve edge to attach the sleeve and close up the armhole. Sew up the shoulders to shape the neckline. To complete your sweater, you will need to sew along the top of each of the shoulders to shape them and create the neckline. Sew along the edges of the front and back pieces of the shoulder to connect them.

Be careful not to make the neck opening too small or you may not be able to get the sweater over your head. After you finish sewing the shoulders and shaping the neckline, tie of the thread an cut the excess. Then, turn the sweater inside out to hide the seams.

Your sweater is complete! What if I want my sweater to be a bit loose, especially in the arms, and I also want to make it a turtleneck? If you want your sweater to be a bit loose, try making it in the next size up according to the pattern. To make it a turtleneck, simply pick-up stitches around the neck-hole, and knit to the desired length. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 1. I followed these instructions and my sweater looks awful. The seams are all weird.

I don't understand where exactly to line up all the pieces. What should I do? Be proud of the fact you finished all the pieces. Sewing it together can be difficult. Not Helpful 4 Helpful 3. While you're working on the instructions before, also follow the next ones. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 0.

Knit a swatch in the gauge of your pattern with the needles you intend to use for your project. Bind off and then wash and dry the swatch as you intend to do with the finished sweater.

Finally, count the number of stitches or rows in the swatch to see if you match the gauge given in the pattern. This would depend on your particular pattern. Are your sleeves in 2 parts? If so, then you would need 4. If not, then 2. What do I do if none of the sweater measuring sizes match my size?

Knitting a sweater is one of the pinnacles of the hobby, and it's one that stops some new knitters in their tracks. A sweater seems like such a big project that will take a lot of time and requires a lot of skill. Aug 10,  · Edit Article How to Knit a Sweater for Beginners. Four Parts: Choosing Your Size and Gathering Materials Creating the Front and Back Pieces of the Sweater Making the Sleeves Assembling Your Sweater Community Q&A Knitting a sweater can be a daunting project for someone who is just beginning to knit%(39). If you've knit a sweater but wanted to cry when you realized that the size didn't turn out right after all your hard work, you are NOT alone. And if you’re too frightened to attempt making a sweater because you've heard horror stories from your fellow knitters, well, you're not alone either.